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Yesterday, we had the opportunity to do a Twitter Q&A with CAPT Craig Ross, a Navy Reserve Physician who also served Active Duty. Below is the text of our conversation (you can also follow #AskASailor on Twitter to read the whole thing!)Q1: Did you get your education as an active member of the Navy or did you go to college first? What is your advice? #AskASailorA1: I went to college first and did my residency training in the Navy. It was an excellent decision for myself. #AskASailorA1 (cont.): I have friends who went to the Uniformed Services Medical School & they loved it. It just depends on what you want. #AskASailorQ2: What advice would you give to an Enlisted Sailor wanting to become a medical Officer? #AskASailorA2: Speak to as many military physicians or providers that you can. #AskASailorQ3: What was the hardest thing about practicing medicine while you were deployed? #AskASailorA3: Working with limited resources and also making sure that you understand the operational needs of the unit you are with. #AskASailorQ4: Were you allowed to specialize in the field of your choice during your training? #AskASailorA4: Yes. There is selection process – a board that meets and it is competitive, just like it is on the civilian side. #AskASailorA4 (cont.): You can apply for anything you want. #AskASailorQ5: What specialties are in need and get the best chance for deployment? #AskASailorA5: Current critical specialties are general surgery, anesthesia, family medicine, psychiatry… #AskASailorA5 (cont.): …and certain internal medicine subspecialties. (On the nursing side, nurse practitioners are critical.) #AskASailorQ6: Which is more challenging, Active Duty or Reserve? #AskASailorA6: Wow. That’s like asking which child is your favorite. (laughs). #AskASailorA6 (cont.): They both present very unique and different challenges and their own rewards. They are just different. #AskASailorQ7: How easy it is to transition from Active Duty to Reserve? #AskASailorA7: Fairly easy. You need to go through a Recruiter and if there is a need on the Reserve side it’s a fairly easy transition. #AskASailor
Thanks to CAPT Craig Ross! Got more questions? Tweet with #AskASailor & we may use them in a future chat.

Yesterday, we had the opportunity to do a Twitter Q&A with CAPT Craig Ross, a Navy Reserve Physician who also served Active Duty. Below is the text of our conversation (you can also follow #AskASailor on Twitter to read the whole thing!)

Q1: Did you get your education as an active member of the Navy or did you go to college first? What is your advice? #AskASailor

A1: I went to college first and did my residency training in the Navy. It was an excellent decision for myself. #AskASailor

A1 (cont.): I have friends who went to the Uniformed Services Medical School & they loved it. It just depends on what you want. #AskASailor

Q2: What advice would you give to an Enlisted Sailor wanting to become a medical Officer? #AskASailor

A2: Speak to as many military physicians or providers that you can. #AskASailor

Q3: What was the hardest thing about practicing medicine while you were deployed? #AskASailor

A3: Working with limited resources and also making sure that you understand the operational needs of the unit you are with. #AskASailor

Q4: Were you allowed to specialize in the field of your choice during your training? #AskASailor

A4: Yes. There is selection process – a board that meets and it is competitive, just like it is on the civilian side. #AskASailor

A4 (cont.): You can apply for anything you want. #AskASailor

Q5: What specialties are in need and get the best chance for deployment? #AskASailor

A5: Current critical specialties are general surgery, anesthesia, family medicine, psychiatry… #AskASailor

A5 (cont.): …and certain internal medicine subspecialties. (On the nursing side, nurse practitioners are critical.) #AskASailor

Q6: Which is more challenging, Active Duty or Reserve? #AskASailor

A6: Wow. That’s like asking which child is your favorite. (laughs). #AskASailor

A6 (cont.): They both present very unique and different challenges and their own rewards. They are just different. #AskASailor

Q7: How easy it is to transition from Active Duty to Reserve? #AskASailor

A7: Fairly easy. You need to go through a Recruiter and if there is a need on the Reserve side it’s a fairly easy transition. #AskASailor

Thanks to CAPT Craig Ross! Got more questions? Tweet with #AskASailor & we may use them in a future chat.

A rainbow over USNS Rainier.

A rainbow over USNS Rainier.

Lead ship of her class, the USS Illinois represents a time in Naval warfare strategy when the ship with the most guns was the most powerful ship in the fleet. The Illinois was armed with 42 guns meant for puncturing enemy armor and fending off enemy aircraft.Learn more about the USS Illinois at http://1.usa.gov/1qix0wM

Lead ship of her class, the USS Illinois represents a time in Naval warfare strategy when the ship with the most guns was the most powerful ship in the fleet. The Illinois was armed with 42 guns meant for puncturing enemy armor and fending off enemy aircraft.

Learn more about the USS Illinois at http://1.usa.gov/1qix0wM

When we need to respond to piracy or distress calls, we turn to the VBSS team.

Landing on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier is one of the most difficult things a Naval Aviator will ever do. With only a small amount of runway space, pilots must snag their plane’s tailhook on one of the ship’s arresting wires. Sound tough? Now let’s try it at night.

Sailors watch a sunset from the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island. How about that view?

Sailors watch a sunset from the flight deck aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island. How about that view?

On this day 54 years ago, the Navy’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise was launched at Newport News, VA. While CVN 65 is no longer in service, the name Enterprise will soon be active again with the newest class of aircraft carriers – the Gerald R. Ford class – with Enterprise CVN 80 coming in 2025.

On this day 54 years ago, the Navy’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Enterprise was launched at Newport News, VA. While CVN 65 is no longer in service, the name Enterprise will soon be active again with the newest class of aircraft carriers – the Gerald R. Ford class – with Enterprise CVN 80 coming in 2025.

A C-2A prepares for landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush.

A C-2A prepares for landing on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush.

In waters east of Japan, Sailors prepare to scrub the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington. (George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing 5, protects and defends the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.)

In waters east of Japan, Sailors prepare to scrub the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington. (George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing 5, protects and defends the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.)

The amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima fires its Mk31 Rolling Airframe Missile Launcher. Boom.

The amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima fires its Mk31 Rolling Airframe Missile Launcher. Boom.