America's Navy. A global force for good.

Did you know we’re on Instagram too? If you love what you’re seeing on Tumblr, be sure to follow us on Instagram @americasnavy for more photos and videos of Sailors, ships, submarines and life in the Navy.

On this Labor Day, if you have the day off from work, enjoy yourself. And remember the 430,000+ Sailors around the world defending our seas, air and land today and every day.

On this Labor Day, if you have the day off from work, enjoy yourself. And remember the 430,000+ Sailors around the world defending our seas, air and land today and every day.

Guess this landing craft air cushion (LCAC) is pretty lucky!

Guess this landing craft air cushion (LCAC) is pretty lucky!

Are you heading to medical school or do you have any medical-related classes this year? Make sure to download the America’s Navy Anatomy Study Guide app. Why?- It’s free!- Features 3-D functionality- Approved by the Navy Bureau of Medicine- Did we mention it’s free?Download it today!App Store: http://bit.ly/1jOUmHlGoogle Play™: http://bit.ly/1pPtYm0

Are you heading to medical school or do you have any medical-related classes this year? Make sure to download the America’s Navy Anatomy Study Guide app. Why?
- It’s free!
- Features 3-D functionality
- Approved by the Navy Bureau of Medicine
- Did we mention it’s free?

Download it today!
App Store: http://bit.ly/1jOUmHl
Google Play™: http://bit.ly/1pPtYm0

USS Freedom (LCS-1) is the leader in its class of littoral combat ships that operate in shallow water zones and are capable of antisubmarine operations, mine sweeping, small ship combat and humanitarian aid missions. These ships are designed to provide support for our larger craft and puncture enemy small ship forces. That’s how the first ship in its class earned the motto “Fast, Focused, Fearless.”

USS Freedom (LCS-1) is the leader in its class of littoral combat ships that operate in shallow water zones and are capable of antisubmarine operations, mine sweeping, small ship combat and humanitarian aid missions.

These ships are designed to provide support for our larger craft and puncture enemy small ship forces. That’s how the first ship in its class earned the motto “Fast, Focused, Fearless.”

Throwback Thursday: An F-14D Tomcat holds in the landing pattern with its tailhook down after conducting a mission over the Persian Gulf region. The Tomcat was retired back in 2006.

Throwback Thursday: An F-14D Tomcat holds in the landing pattern with its tailhook down after conducting a mission over the Persian Gulf region. The Tomcat was retired back in 2006.

Yesterday, we had the opportunity to do a Twitter Q&A with LT j.g. Mellany George and LT j.g. Melody George-Jones, asking questions we compiled from our followers. Below is the text of our conversation (you can also follow #AskASailor on Twitter to read the whole thing!)
Q1: What’s a typical day like being in the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor
A1: One weekend a month we go to “drill”, wear our uniforms, meet with our unit, & do administrative stuff. #AskASailor

Q2: Why does the Navy Reserve exist? #AskASailor
A2: To be ready to deploy. Also there are areas where there aren’t enough Active Duty personnel so we fill in the gaps. #AskASailor

Q3: What is the likelihood of a deployment in the Reserve? #AskASailor
A3: It depends on the job. For us, we are in a 5-year qualification program so we still have some time before we deploy. #AskASailor

Q4: What made you choose a STEM field? #AskASailor
A4: Parents were always very encouraging for whatever we wanted to do. Also there are not many females in STEM fields. #AskASailor
A4 (cont.): We would have engineering courses where there was a class of 30 guys and only 3 women! #AskASailor

Q5: What’s it like being a female Officer in that field? #AskASailor
A5: We are given respect just like anybody else in our units. #AskASailor

Q6: You are moms. Can parents join the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor
A6: Yes, the Navy is unique in that they allow you to join even being a single parent. Not every branch does. #AskASailor

Q7: When you drill each month, does it get easier being away from your family (kids)? #AskASailor
A7: It’s never easy but it does get easier. You have to have a strong family network and support. #AskASailor
A7 (cont.): You’re serving your country. Although I am a parent, I still like to do things, I still want a career. #AskASailor

Q8: Would you encourage your child to serve in the Navy? #AskASailor
A8: She is 6 and already wants to join the Navy! That is going to be her decision to make in the end. #AskASailor

Q9: What did you do to get in shape for the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor
A9: Joined a gym. I’m not a naturally athletic person so I am a good model for those who didn’t ever work out before joining! #AskASailor
A9 (cont.): Meeting weight standards & physical requirements can be a struggle, but the Navy has helped me. #AskASailor
A9 (cont.): If you’re not a runner there are alternative cardio options; elliptical, bike & swimming are options as well. #AskASailor

Thanks to LTJGs Mellany George & Melody George-Jones! Got your own questions? Tweet with #AskASailor & we may use them in a future chat.

Yesterday, we had the opportunity to do a Twitter Q&A with LT j.g. Mellany George and LT j.g. Melody George-Jones, asking questions we compiled from our followers. Below is the text of our conversation (you can also follow #AskASailor on Twitter to read the whole thing!)

Q1: What’s a typical day like being in the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor

A1: One weekend a month we go to “drill”, wear our uniforms, meet with our unit, & do administrative stuff. #AskASailor

Q2: Why does the Navy Reserve exist? #AskASailor

A2: To be ready to deploy. Also there are areas where there aren’t enough Active Duty personnel so we fill in the gaps. #AskASailor

Q3: What is the likelihood of a deployment in the Reserve? #AskASailor

A3: It depends on the job. For us, we are in a 5-year qualification program so we still have some time before we deploy. #AskASailor

Q4: What made you choose a STEM field? #AskASailor

A4: Parents were always very encouraging for whatever we wanted to do. Also there are not many females in STEM fields. #AskASailor

A4 (cont.): We would have engineering courses where there was a class of 30 guys and only 3 women! #AskASailor

Q5: What’s it like being a female Officer in that field? #AskASailor

A5: We are given respect just like anybody else in our units. #AskASailor

Q6: You are moms. Can parents join the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor

A6: Yes, the Navy is unique in that they allow you to join even being a single parent. Not every branch does. #AskASailor

Q7: When you drill each month, does it get easier being away from your family (kids)? #AskASailor

A7: It’s never easy but it does get easier. You have to have a strong family network and support. #AskASailor

A7 (cont.): You’re serving your country. Although I am a parent, I still like to do things, I still want a career. #AskASailor

Q8: Would you encourage your child to serve in the Navy? #AskASailor

A8: She is 6 and already wants to join the Navy! That is going to be her decision to make in the end. #AskASailor

Q9: What did you do to get in shape for the Navy Reserve? #AskASailor

A9: Joined a gym. I’m not a naturally athletic person so I am a good model for those who didn’t ever work out before joining! #AskASailor

A9 (cont.): Meeting weight standards & physical requirements can be a struggle, but the Navy has helped me. #AskASailor

A9 (cont.): If you’re not a runner there are alternative cardio options; elliptical, bike & swimming are options as well. #AskASailor

Thanks to LTJGs Mellany George & Melody George-Jones! Got your own questions? Tweet with #AskASailor & we may use them in a future chat.

The U.S. 6th Fleet command ship USS Mount Whitney arrives at Zeebrugge, Belgium. Zeebrugge is a Clean Port – as you can see the windmills in the background of the photo.

The U.S. 6th Fleet command ship USS Mount Whitney arrives at Zeebrugge, Belgium. Zeebrugge is a Clean Port – as you can see the windmills in the background of the photo.

Watch out you guys.

Watch out you guys.

There is no shortage of aircraft in the Navy. Here, an EA-6B Prowler prepares to land as two F/A-18E Super Hornets fly behind it.
Do you know how many (operational) aircraft the Navy has right now?

There is no shortage of aircraft in the Navy. Here, an EA-6B Prowler prepares to land as two F/A-18E Super Hornets fly behind it.

Do you know how many (operational) aircraft the Navy has right now?